The Future of Short Fiction is Looking Good

Pixel Hall Press Welcomes Queries from Authors of Short Fiction

PHP logo

Pixie Hall Press (PHP), a relatively new, old-fashioned small publishing house that focuses on discovering literary gems and great stories that might otherwise be overlooked; have predicted that the market for short stories and novellas is about to experience a renaissance.

With this in mind PHP have announced  that later this year, in addition to its catalogue of print and eBook novels, it will be launching PHP Shorts, a series of stand-alone short stories and novellas that will be published as eBooks. There is also scope for some PHP Shorts to also be collected into print anthologies.

This small, US-based publisher is looking for highly polished, well crafted stories. More than genre, PHP editors will be considering how compelling the story is, how memorable the characters are, and how the narrative develops while avoiding clichés.

As a small boutique publishing house, PHP can’t offer an advance at this time. But they do claim to offer authors a higher percentage of the profits than is traditional, plus other advantages, including, if the author wishes, creative involvement in publishing decisions.

Before submitting a story to Pixel Hall Press, send  a query email to Info@PixelHallPress.com. Quote my name ‘Gemma Feltham- review blogger’ and your query will get a boost out of the slush pile and into the read soon pile!  Wow the editors with a summary or synopsis, then tell them a bit about yourself. They will respond to all queries, but please be patient, since it may take a few weeks. Also, please understand that, as a small boutique publishing house, they cannot say “yes!” to every query, regardless of how good it is.

Small boutique imprints like Pixel Hall Press are reclaiming the heart and soul of publishing by reviving the idea that a publisher’s raison d’être is to find and nurture great writers, and to provide readers with beautiful, meaningful, truly entertaining and enjoyable books.

Determined to stay small and relevant, Pixel Hall Press will be moving forward slowly and deliberately, adding stories and books from only a handful of new authors each year. In addition, starting in 2014, Pixel Hall Press will publish one or two single-themed short story anthologies annually. A significant portion of the profits from each anthology will be donated to a charity germane to the subject of the book.

Find more information about Pixie Hall Press on their website: http://www.pixelhallpress.com/index.html

© Gemma Feltham April 25 2013

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “The Future of Short Fiction is Looking Good

  1. It’s funny. I can’t decide if, as a process, I LIKE hearing about ‘traditional’ publishers, who are, supposedly, gonna ‘nurture new talent.’

    I feel as if entities, interested in helping writers who write ebook short fiction, at this point, should be investigating NEWER ways of helping writers. Longer story as to why I feel this.

    I’m not completely keen on what Amazon seems to be using writers for. And I came to the internet in 2001 and had a chance to engage Harlan Ellison, who is the king of the era of short story, and I COMPLETELY understand what THAT era was about and why things happened.

    But, to me, something has changed in the mix for writers. Do we really need this ‘traditional’ style of help?

    Thanks for the thoughtwave though. Now I’m gonna try and figure this out.

    Heather
    wordwan

    Like

  2. Pingback: Self Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing: The Reader’s Perspective | Jaye Em Edgecliff

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